I love a good campfire! A campfire adds ambience to almost any event. It's crackle and smell is the foundation of fantastic memories and a campfire is often the punctuation at the end of a day in the outdoors.

Add Color to Complement the Crackle Of Your Campfire or Fireplace

I love a good campfire!  A campfire adds ambience to almost any event.  It’s crackle and smell is the foundation of fantastic memories and a campfire is often the punctuation at the end of a day in the outdoors.

By using a little chemistry, you can add amazing color to your campfire or fireplace flames and paint a palate of color that will impress your friends.

For Colorful Flames


If you want colored flames, you can do the following — but it must be prepared well in advance:

Pick the color(s) you want your flames to be and get the chemical(s) needed to produce the effect. Chemicals can be gotten locally (sometimes from stores that deal with fireplaces) or online, such as from this place http://www.chemistrystore.com/. You only need “technical grade” chemicals, not the (more expensive) “purified grade”.


 

red flames

strontium chloride

carmine flames

lithium chloride

orange flames

calcium chloride (a bleaching powder)

white flames

magnesium sulphate (Epsom Salts)

blue flames

cupric chloride (copper chloride)

green flames

copper sulphate (blue vitrol)

yellow flames

sodium chloride

yellowish-green flames

sodium borate (borax)

purple flames

potassium chloride

violet flames

potassium sulphate (chromealum) mixed
3 to 1 with potassium nitrate (saltpeter)

Wear rubber glovers during this procedure. Now, add the chemical(s), singly, to a plastic container of water for each flame color — adding as much as the water will absorb (about a half a pound per gallon of water).

Soak your wood, “logs” made of tightly-rolled newspapers, or some pine cones in the solution(s) overnight (you can also use sawdust to sprinkle onto fire to make briefly burning colored flames. Just stir some liquid glue into the liquid, too, and then add the sawdust. The glue will allow chunks to form).

Take the wood/cones/sawdust out of the liquid, lay out on newspapers, and allow to dry thoroughly (for sawdust, spread out onto sheets and dry). Save the newspapers on which they’ve dried, and roll them up tightly to form “logs,” too, as they can produce pretty colors from the chemicals they’ve absorbed.

Just throw these things on to your fire for pretty flames (can also be used on indoor fires, but ventilation should be good). The chemicals can be thrown directly onto the fire, too, for short bursts of color.

Check out the full story on building a good bonfire here from the folks at Fisheaters website.

Using the BBQ Dragon will bring an extra bit of functional fun to your next campfire!

I love a good campfire!  A campfire adds ambience to almost any event.  It's crackle and smell is the foundation of fantastic memories and a campfire is often the punctuation at the end of a day in the outdoors.

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